console retirement plan

With new consoles on the market, and plans to move to San Francisco later this year, I figured it was time to cut down on some of the console clutter I’ve collected over the years. For now, I still have our 360 and PS3, but I’ve traded in a bunch of 360 games, given the Wii to my parents, and sold our long-disused PS2 and all our old PS2 and GameCube games. I’ve also sold off a bunch of DS and GBA games, and my DS Lite and GBA SP consoles themselves won’t be far behind.

Thankfully, if I ever get nostalgic, those systems I’ve retired — the PS2, GameCube, Wii, DS, and GBA — can all be emulated. In my last post I talked about using Dolphin to emulate the GameCube and Wii; for the PS2, there’s PCSX2, which like Dolphin can render games at high resolutions to improve quality; for the DS, there’s DeSmuME (and an excellent Android port of it, called DraStic); and for the GBA, there’s VBA-M.

Animal Crossing Wild World running (in Japanese, coincidentally) under DraStic, an excellent DS emulator for Android

Animal Crossing Wild World running (in Japanese, coincidentally) under DraStic, an excellent DS emulator for Android


For the Wii, GameCube, and PS2, I was even able to back up my save games, using GCMM and Savegame Manager GX on the Wii for the GameCube and Wii saves, respectively, and uLaunchElf on the PS2, to dump the saves to a USB stick. In both cases, I had to pull some tricks to run third-party code — on the Wii, installing the Homebrew Channel is fairly straightforward, but on the PS2 I had to use my Swap Magic discs.

To next-gen, or to PC?

New console launches are usually a cause for excitement, but their release just reminds me of what we’re losing with the end of the previous generation. Consoles have come and gone in the past, of course, but the move to digital distribution has made separating the consoles from their content much more difficult this time around. If I sold my 360 or PS3 today, I couldn’t resell all their digital content; I still own that content, and if I bought a new 360 in a few years I could reinstall it, but what about 5 years from now, or 10?

Even if it’s not perfect, the PC does offer a better alternative. Some old games are unplayable today, but if a game has a dedicated community, chances are that someone’s worked out how to run it on modern PCs. Steam’s DRM has so far proven mostly benign, and services like GOG and the Humble Store offer DRM-free downloads, too.

With dozens of great games on Steam, using Linux for PC gaming has never been more viable

With dozens of great games on Steam, using Linux for PC gaming has never been more viable

In fact, I seem to have made the jump to PC already, almost by accident. I’ve played a couple of big-name games this year, like Bioshock Infinite and Tomb Raider, but I’ve spent much more time playing smaller, more interesting games, like Kerbal Space Program, Gone Home, The Stanley Parable, Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons, Kentucky Route Zero, Papers, Please, and most recently, the Double Fine Adventure game, Broken Age, almost all of which are PC exclusives.

PC power

PC gaming has a lot of baggage — the image of the hardcore gamer that spends as much time upgrading and tweaking their Windows PC as they spend actually playing games on it — but these smaller games often defy that image. Most run on Linux and Mac OS X, and most also run on fairly modest PCs; in fact, I’ve spent more time gaming on my now 2011 Macbook Air in the last year than I have on any other system.

I’m sure I’ll want to play another big-budget graphical powerhouse eventually, and I’m not yet sure what I’ll do about that. By that time, a gaming PC with the power of the next-gen consoles might only cost as much as those consoles cost now. I like the idea of gaming laptops, but they’re expensive and clunky; only the Razer Blade delivers suitable power in a sleek, elegant form-factor, but at US$2000 it’s even more expensive than other laptops.

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